We’re using temperature controlled shakers, incubators and computer-controlled spraying apparatus to test potential bio-pesticides. Samples which have performed well have already being taken forward to mass production studies. One imminent area of interest to farmers and the agrichemical industry is examination of oil seed rape to extract cabbage flea stem beetle and carry out bioassays to find possible fungal pathogens.

 Why is there a need

Now is the time and opportunity to tackle a range of pests and diseases for the major UK crops using biological pesticides. With chemical pesticides being banned for use, and fewer chemical active ingredients coming onto the market, the demand for biological control has never been greater. The EU sustainable pesticide usage Directive 2009/128/EC sets out clear guidelines that include the development and usage of biological pesticides, to help reduce the risks to people and the environment.

What is the asset

CHAP will facilitate the development of novel, large scale screening for potential fungal biopesticides to control the main crops identified as current relevance to UK agriculture and the UK’s food supply chain. Using temperature controlled shakers, incubators and computer-controlled spraying apparatus, CABI will develop a biopesticide product development pipeline and prove principle by screening an initial batch of biopesticides from the CABI culture collection to determine pathogenicity to a range of insect pests – as selected by the commercial partners. One imminent area of interest to farmers and the agrichemical industry is examination of oil seed rape to extract cabbage flea stem beetle and carry out bioassays to find possible fungal pathogens.

Why is it of interest to farmers

With the current chemical armoury almost empty, now is the time to develop these new products which could result in high economic returns giving farmers alternatives or replacements to banned chemical pesticides. One specific area of interest to farmers and the agrichemical industry is the examination of oil seed rape to extract cabbage flea stem beetle and carry out bioassays to find possible fungal pathogens.

For more information please contact

Belinda Luke at CABI (b.luke@cabi.org).